An Easter Six on Saturday (11 April 2020)

Ah, blue skies, sunshine and positively balmy temperatures. Perfect weather for pricking out and potting on seedlings outdoors, and that’s just how I started my Easter break yesterday morning. I was sure I’d been a bit more restrained with the old seed sowing this year but I’m already struggling to find space in the mini greenhouse and on window sills for things, and there are still several trays of this and that to deal with in a week or two. However, I think I’ve figured out where I’ve gone wrong. Though I’ve sown less of everything there’s been a lot more ‘everything’ sown than in previous years.

Therefore I’m going to resist sowing any more seeds this spring…. well, apart from a packet of leftover Coreopsis seed I discovered this morning… and perhaps a few free seeds from the Garden News magazine. Thank goodness for self-seeders that just get on with it. And it’s a self-seeder that kicks off my Six on Saturday today.

1. Several years ago I sowed what I thought was a scented pink perennial variety of Honesty, but it turned out to be this one. Still, it is lovely, if a little rampant; given half a chance it would happily take over the ‘wildlife’ border. Last year I was a bit too ruthless and pulled most of it up. This time I’ve pretty much left it to do what it likes, moving the odd plant here and there. It might be a foolhardy idea but I’m tempted to put some in the other borders.

2. Growing in the same border as the Honesty is the Viburnum carlesii ‘Compactum.’ Its flowers have just started to open, which is fortunate as it grows next to the blue shed where I undertake the potting on of seedlings, allowing me to appreciate their delicious fragrance. The unopened pink buds are an added bonus.

3. Continuing the white theme, a double primrose. I split this every year. Some are given away but most are planted elsewhere in the garden.

4. Okay, time for some vibrant colour. This pink Primula appears to be thriving next to the new log pile behind the bird bath.

5. Another Primula up next. This one was acquired from the free nursery up in Wales (my mum’s garden) last year. It’s bulked up nicely and, like the double Primrose, will be split to make a few plants once it has finished flowering. If it does as well here as it does in Wales it’ll be a right show one day.

6. And finally… Tulips… again. Some of them are beginning to go over and there have been a few duff ones where the flower buds have shrivelled up for some reason. However, others have just started to bloom. Gazing out at the garden from the conservatory yesterday evening I started to feel slightly anxious, wondering what will fill the colourful tulip void once they finish. I felt the same pang of tulip anxiety last year and I only had one pot of them back then. But all will be well, other plants are waiting in the wings. ‘Tis the way of gardening.

And they were my Six on Saturday. For more Sixes on Saturday, from all around the world, take a look at the site of the chap who started it all over at https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com.

Advertisement

27 thoughts on “An Easter Six on Saturday (11 April 2020)

  1. Oh, I’m a wee bit envious of your blue skies, sunshine and temperatures! Light rain this morning, but at least the winds have dropped and it might cheer up later.

    Sowing less but more is good. You’ll have many more varieties for your eyes to feast on, and also to photograph! That’s a lovely border.

    The Honesty and Viburnum are gorgeous, you’re filling my thoughts with garden envy. As for the double white primrose…they are fabulous and the tulips are painting your garden with colour.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. It sounds as though we’ve been lucky here then with the weather. I hope it cheers up there. I think we’re having some rain tomorrow which we’re in need of. I hope the winds don’t pick up though!

      I’ve gone for several different varieties of some of last year’s successes, including Cosmos and Scabious, as well as a few varieties of Zinnia, although the latter are being a bit stubborn to germinate this time for some reason.

      Like

  2. Yesterday it was for me the harvest of dried flowers of primulas, I have a dozen different colours because they crossed, unfortunately the doubles don’t produce seeds…
    what is the name of the red tulip with a yellow line in top left?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Love the double white primrose, and the honesty. The honesty seeds I planted just popped through yesterday, white with variegated foliage if they are as advertised. Looking forward to seeing your “after the tulips” border again!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. I love the white double primrose. I have a yellow double with the same ruff of leaves behind the flowers but it has produced stems and ruffs but no flowers this year. Lot of splitting coming up, methinks.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve gone for mainly wildlife friendly flowers in the garden but every so often I go for not so pollinater-friendly types purely for human appreciation. Having said that the butterflies enjoyed sunning themselves on the pom-pom variety of dahlias last year.

      Like

  5. I really love that daphne. Does ‘compactum’ mean it’s small or does that refer to something else? And that double primrose! Just wow. I’m having the same tulip anxiety. They shock us out of winter, then we get on w/the more sedate blooms of summer.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. The Primulas are lovely. The only problem with self seeders is that they self seed lol. I am always having to thin out Borage plants every year. I keep my seed sowing under control only because I am usually to busy with work to look after all the seedlings. Hope all is well with you and your family.

    Liked by 2 people

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s