Six on Saturday (21 August 2021)

The train to Cornwall was caught with plenty of time to spare last Saturday and apart from a temporary blip at Plymouth where we ended up without a train driver (don’t ask) all went to plan. Four days were spent pottering around Truro (where I lived for over a year way back in the mists of time) and Falmouth. Despite the slightly gloomy weather spirits were high, helped by the tropicalesque gardens in Falmouth and the odd Roskilly’s ice cream.

August is racing by and, rather worryingly, leaves have begun to fall from some of the trees on the green. I’ve started pondering a few changes shrub-wise come the autumn, but in the meantime I’m going to enjoy the garden as is. Well, sort of as is. Some of the plants that usually provide lots of late summer colour have struggled so far and I’m beginning to wonder whether they’ll actually make it to flowerhood before the first frosts. An emergency plant has had to be deployed, and that leads me to my first Six on Saturday…

1. Dahlia ‘Dark Angels Mixed.’ I left most of my Dahlias in the ground over the winter (as I’ve done in previous years). This time the gamble didn’t pay off; they didn’t reappear. However, those that were left in pots survived and several new tubers were planted in the spring. All seemed to be going to plan initially but then the slimy plant assassins of the night struck. Hopes that any will flower are fading, hence this ‘here’s one someone grew earlier’ bargain purchase made yesterday.

2. A lot of the annuals in the garden are grown from packets of free seed that come with the Garden News Magazine. Rudbeckia ‘Sputnik’ was sown in the spring. Alas, only one plant has survived but it’s a good ‘un.

3. Another Garden News Magazine freebie up next: Cornflower ‘Black Ball.’ I rarely have much success growing cornflowers (I don’t think any of the blue lot have survived, despite sowing some in pots and scattering the rest here, there and everywhere). This is the only ‘Black Ball’ to have made it this far. I may try again next year.

4. Violas usually only feature in my SoSs in winter and spring. Removed from the tulip pots in May and plonked in the ground, some are still going strong, including this beauty.

5. Agastache ‘Black Adder’ has yet to overwinter successfully in my garden but I still find myself buying replacement plants each year. The flowers are popular with the bees and I enjoy the aromatic foliage. I may try digging some up come the winter.

6. And finally… Another yellow Crocosmia. Last week I featured ‘Columbus.’ I think this might be ‘George Davison.’ I have a plan to label all the yellow Crocosmia so that I can spread them around the garden whilst getting shot of some of the orange variety that is in danger of taking over. Whether I’ll actually get around to it though is another matter.

They were my Six on Saturday. For more Sixes on Saturday, from all around the world, take a look at the site of the chap who started it all over at https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com.

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29 thoughts on “Six on Saturday (21 August 2021)

  1. Nice Six! Love, love, love that dahlia and the agastache is a beauty. I now need an agastache. Glad you had a good time in Cornwall, we are due a visit very soon. Liking the look of those public gardens (no attempt made to spell it), we need more like that! Have a good week.

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  2. Liking the dark cornflower. Like you cornflowers, dahlias were not great this year, slimies like them too much. Agastache supposed to be hardy but for me they’re annuals and I stopped buying them just not to get disappointed. Glad you enjoyed your trip.

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  3. I grew ‘Black ball’ last year and I had only 5 or 6 flowers. I was hoping it would self-seed but it didn’t work. I’m going to get new seeds.
    Very pretty Rudbeckia “Sputnik”.
    It’s weird that you can’t overwinter your agastaches in your garden, it’s not much colder than in mine. I cut down the stems to the ground when they are deflowered and I put them there. They start again in the spring and the seeds germinate. An idea to test for you maybe?

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  4. I didn’t have a good year for Dahlias either, those damned assassins, but sometimes that can be easily solved by your strategy of buying one someone else grew! A great splash of colour anyway. I love ‘Black ball’ – am sure I sowed seed but none came up, sigh!

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  5. A lovely six. I hope you don’t mind, but I am quite happy that you also fail with growing things from seeds, makes me feel less adequate. I have actually managed to raise a few Zinnia from seed though, surprise surprise! Hardly worth it though for quite spindly specimens. I won’t bother next year. I keep meaning to pop over to Falmouth, but at the moment Cornwall is far too busy for me, and Falmouth and Newquay are hotspots for the dreaded virus so I’m staying well away.

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    1. I have many seed sowing failures. No shows, those that start off well and then snuff it and those that do fine until I plant them in the ground. I’ve been surprised by the lack of mask wearing on trains and in shops by both young and middle-aged. Admittedly it’s now a choice but I thought common sense might have prevailed.

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  6. A beautiful collection of flowers, One Man. I like the Agastache: such rewarding plants and completely undemanding. Like Jude I have little success at growing things from seed, but as the weather warms up here, I’m about to have yet another go.

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  7. Lovely pictures. Our daughter used to work very near to the G. Gardens so it was lovely to see them mentioned. Happy memories of many visits. Agastache sound so easy to grow, in theory, but you’re not alone with the struggle. I have an Agastache story for next weeks Six.

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  8. The Gardens look beautiful. I’m intrigued by those tall spires in the top photo! Do you know what plants they are? The flower power in that photo is gorgeous.
    I like the new Dahlia, and the yellow Crocosmia! I just have the common one, and a yellow would be great! Although the dark cornflower is pretty, I think I would miss the stunning blue of the usual variety.

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